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Makar Sankranti ,Pongal, Kite flying festival with Gau pooja with evening Lohri Celebration
Makar Sankranti ,Pongal, Kite flying festival with Gau pooja with evening Lohri Celebration

Sun, Jan 14

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Texas Gaushala

Makar Sankranti ,Pongal, Kite flying festival with Gau pooja with evening Lohri Celebration

Where:- 20303 Kickapoo Rd , Waller Tx When:- Jan ,14 ,2024 Time 11:30 am to 3:30pm Lohri celebration Time :- 4 pm -5:30 pm Authentic Pongal cooking on brick stove and Performing Gau Pooja Kite flying Lohri celebration NOTE: Mud pot will be provided for cooking pongal. bring your own spoon ladle.

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Time & Location

Jan 14, 2024, 11:00 AM – 5:30 PM

Texas Gaushala, 20303 Kickapoo Rd

About the event

*Registration will close by 12 th Jan 10 AM* Where:- 20303 Kickapoo Rd , Waller Tx

When:- Jan ,14 ,2024

Time 11:30 am to 3:30pm

Lohri celebration

Time :- 4 pm -5:30 pm

Authentic Pongal cooking on brick stove and Performing Gau Pooja

Kite flying

Lohri celebration

NOTE: Mud pot will be provided for cooking pongal. bring your own spoon ladle and mat for sitting .

*Registration will close by 12 th Jan 10 AM*

Outside kites are now allowed . Kites will sale in Gaushala in reasonable price

Pongal cooking, Gau Pooja , Cow Feeding $101

Gau Pooja and Cow feeding $51

Cow Feeding $25

Prasad Sponsorship $251

Lohri Prasad Sponsorship $151

All Cow Feed Sponsorship for whole day $251

Makar Sankranti is a Hindu festival that marks the transition of the sun into the zodiac sign of Capricorn (Makara). It usually takes place around January 14th each year and marks the end of the winter solstice. The festival is celebrated in various parts of India and is known by different names in different regions.

Key features of Makar Sankranti include:

Harvest Festival: Like Pongal, Makar Sankranti is also a harvest festival. It is a time when farmers thank the Sun God for a good harvest.

Kite Flying: One of the most popular activities during Makar Sankranti is kite flying. People, especially in North India, engage in kite-flying competitions, and the sky is filled with colorful kites. The significance of flying kites during this festival varies across regions.

Traditional Food: Different regions have their own traditional dishes associated with Makar Sankranti. In many places, sesame seeds and jaggery are consumed as they are considered auspicious during this time.

Holy Dips: Taking a dip in sacred rivers is considered auspicious during Makar Sankranti. Pilgrims gather at places like Prayag (Allahabad) where the Ganges, Yamuna, and Saraswati rivers meet.

Cultural Significance: Makar Sankranti is not just a Hindu festival; it is celebrated by various communities across India and is known by different names such as Magh Bihu in Assam, Pongal in Tamil Nadu, and Uttarayan in Gujarat.

Bonfires: In some regions, people light bonfires during Makar Sankranti, symbolizing the end of winter and the onset of longer days.

The festival is a time for socializing, joy, and expressing gratitude for the harvest. It also signifies the transition of the sun into the northern hemisphere, leading to longer days and the gradual increase of warmth and daylight. The exact customs and traditions associated with Makar Sankranti can vary widely depending on the region and local cultural practices.

Pongal is a popular harvest festival celebrated in the southern Indian state. The festival marks the end of the winter season and the beginning of the harvest season.

The main event during Pongal is the cooking of a special dish also called "Pongal." It is a dish made from newly harvested rice boiled in milk with jaggery (a type of unrefined sugar), and often flavored with ghee (clarified butter), cashew nuts, and raisins. The boiling of the Pongal dish is symbolic of abundance and prosperity.

Pongal is a four-day festival, and each day has its own significance:

Bhogi Pongal: On the first day, people discard old belongings and celebrate the day as a mark of getting rid of the past and embracing new things.

Thai Pongal: The second day, Thai Pongal, is the main day of the festival when the special Pongal dish is cooked and offered to the Sun God as a gesture of gratitude for the harvest.

Maatu Pongal: The third day is dedicated to the worship of cattle, particularly cows, as they play a significant role in agriculture.

Kaanum Pongal: The fourth day is a day for family outings and get-togethers. People visit friends and relatives, and it's a time for socializing.

Lohri is a popular winter festival celebrated in the northern regions of India, primarily in the states of Punjab, Haryana, Delhi, and parts of Himachal Pradesh. It usually falls on January 13th every year. Lohri marks the end of the winter season and is associated with the harvest of winter crops like sugarcane, mustard, and sesame.

Key features of Lohri include:

Bonfire (Lohri Bonfire): The central feature of Lohri celebrations is the lighting of a bonfire. People gather around the bonfire, throw sesame seeds, sugarcane, and other offerings into it, and sing and dance around it. The bonfire symbolizes the energy of the sun and is believed to bring warmth and fertility to the land.

Traditional Songs and Dance: People perform traditional folk dances, especially the Bhangra and Gidda, around the bonfire. They sing Lohri songs, which often have themes related to the winter harvest, folk tales, and general merriment.

Offerings and Prayers: People offer prayers to the fire and seek blessings for prosperity and a good harvest. They also offer sweets, popcorn, sesame seeds, and jaggery to the fire.

Distributing Prasad: After the prayers, the prasad (offerings made to the bonfire) is distributed among the attendees. This typically includes sesame seeds, gajak (a sweet made from sesame seeds and jaggery), and other traditional sweets.

Community Celebration: Lohri is often celebrated in communities, bringing people together for a night of festivity and socializing. It is particularly significant for newlyweds and new parents, as it is considered auspicious for them.

Lohri is a festival that celebrates the spirit of community, abundance, and the changing seasons. It holds cultural and historical significance in the agrarian context of northern India and is a time for joyous festivities and communal bonding.Pongal is not only a celebration of the harvest but also a time for expressing thanks to nature, the Sun God, and the cattle for their contribution to agriculture. It is a joyous occasion marked by colorful decorations, traditional clothing, and various cultural activities.

Schedule


  • 3 hours 30 minutes

    Pongal Making at wooden Fire

    Temple Area

  • 1 hour

    Undhiyu, Poori, Jalabi and Lemon Rice

    Main Temple Area
1 more item available

Sewa

  • Sponsorship

    This free ticket will make the entry into Gaushala for various Activities. Cow feeding sponsorship and other activities can be purchased on same ticket.

    From $25.00 to $251.00
    Sale ended
    • $101.00
    • $25.00
    • $51.00

Total

$0.00

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